How to Knit in Jersey

How to Knit in Jersey

How to Knit in Jersey

Contents

    – Knitting in purl jersey

    – Knitting in purl stitch

    – Adding selvage stitches in stockinette stitch

Knitting in stockinette is the perfect exercise for beginners who want to learn how to knit because all you need to know is the basic stitches: the purl and the obverse stitch. It is a regular, flat stitch used to knit sweaters easily. It has the peculiarity of rolling on the edges, so it is advisable to use it for works requiring seams or adding borders so that it does not roll. There are two types of stockinette stitch: purl and a single stitch.

Here’s how to knit in purl or obverse stockinette.

Knitting in right-side stockinette

Right side stockinette stitch is achieved by alternating one row of right side stitch with one row of purl stitch when knitting with straight needles. The right side stockinette is a sequence of V’s on the right side of the work. As it rolls over the edges, it is possible to add selvages to obtain a flat knit.

Knitting in right-sided stockinette with straight needles

    1. Knit the desired number of stitches. Jersey stitch is knitted on an even or odd number of stitches because it is not a fancy stitch.

    2. Knit the first-row right side up.

    3. Knit the second-row purl.

    4. Always repeat these two rows throughout the knitting process.

Remember: place the yarn in front of the work when knitting purl and behind the work when knitting purl.

Knitting in right side stockinette with circular needles

Right side stockinette is achieved by knitting all the stitches right side up in each row because the work is always done on the right side when knitting in the round. Knitting in the round does not require edge stitches.

    1. Stitch the desired number of stitches on an even or odd number of stitches.

    2. Knit the first round right side up and mark the end of the round with a loop made of colored yarn. The stitch binding-off yarn can also be used as a marker at the end of the row.

    3. Knit all rounds right side up.

    4. Be sure to pull the first two stitches of the round tightly together not to create a boundary.

Note: the yarn connected to the ball is always behind the work when knitting in the round in purl.

Knitting in purl stockinette

Purl stockinette is a tight wave pattern that looks like a moss stitch. Purl stockinette is achieved by alternating a purl row on the right side of the work and a right side row on the wrong side when knitting with straight needles. This stitch is also visible on the wrong side of a work knitted in purl.

Knitting in purl with straight needles

    1. Stitch the required number of stitches. Purl stitch is knitted on an even or odd number of stitches.

    2. Knit the first-row purl.

    3. Knit the second-row purl.

    4. Always repeat these two rows.

Place the yarn in front of the work to knit the purl rows on the right side of the work.

Place the yarn behind the work to knit the purl rows on the wrong side of the work.

Knitting purl with circular needles (in the round)

    1. Stitch the required number of stitches.

    2. Mark the end of the round with colored yarn or mark the end with yarn.

    3. Knit all rounds inside out.

Place the yarn in front of the work to knit the purl rounds.

Adding edge stitches to stockinette stitch

How to Knit in Jersey

Because stockinette stitch rolls on the edges, it is sometimes necessary to add edge stitches to achieve a flat knit (edge stitches are the first and last stitches in a row). If a rolling edge is the desired effect or if it is indicated in the pattern you are knitting, it is not mandatory to add flat edges in work. It is also possible to iron your knitted fabric to flatten the edges. If you are knitting something intended for sewing, selvages are unnecessary, so the result is usually interwoven.

The simple chain selvage

    – Place the yarn connected to the ball at the back of the work.

    – On the right side of the work, slip the first stitch from the left needle onto the right needle as if knitting it right side up, then knit the next stitch’s right side up.

    – Knit the last stitch right side up.

    – On the wrong side of the work, place the yarn in front of the work.

    – Slip the first stitch from the left needle onto the right needle as if knitting purl, and then knit the next stitch purl.

    – Knit the selvage stitches in each row of the work.

The simple beaded selvage

    – Place the yarn connected to the ball at the back of the work.

    – On the right side of the work, slip the first stitch from the left needle onto the right needle as if you were knitting it right side up, then knit the following stitches as usual.

    – Knit the last stitch right side up.

    – On the wrong side of the work, slip the first stitch from the left needle onto the right needle as if knitting right side up, and then knit the following stitches right side up.

    – Knit the edge stitches in each row of the work.

Note: Be sure to pull the edge stitches tight on both sides of the work to create a clean, even edge.

    – To prevent the edge of the binding-off stitches from rolling over the stockinette stitch, plan to knit a few rows of mossy or 1/1 ribbing. This is a method often used to knit sweaters.

Read more:

Knitted Fabric

How to Bring In the Threads of a Knitted Fabric

How to Bring In the Threads of a Knitted Fabric

Contents

    – Case 1: tucking in the threads on foam stitch or jersey

    – Case 2: tucking in the threads on a ribbed stitch

Tucking in the threads of a knitted fabric is a finishing touch after folding down the stitches when the work is finished. The yarns that protrude correspond:

    – the yarn of the stitch set-up row;

    – the yarns used to change the balls;

    – the yarn used to turn the stitches down.

This is an essential step because tucking in the yarns of a knitted fabric hides unsightly threads and consolidates the work so that the stitches do not become unraveled at the place where the yarns are located.

There are several methods to tuck in the threads of a knitted fabric. It depends mainly on the type of stitch used to knit your work or the yarn used. Here is how to tuck in the threads of a knitted fabric.

Case 1: tucking in yarns on foam stitch or stockinette

Knitted Fabric

Before bringing in the threads of knitted fabric, it is important to use the right material. To bring in the threads, use a wool needle.

    – This is a needle with a large eye to facilitate the passage of thicker or thinner wools.

    – These needles are also used to sew knitted work. You can buy them in sets of $3 for about $3.

    – The wool needles can be made of plastic or aluminum.

The thread hidden in the knitting must be at least 20 cm long. The yarns are tucked in horizontally, about ten stitches, and on the wrong side of the knitting so that the work is invisible on the right side of the knitting.

Place your work on the wrong side of the knitting, make sure not to tighten your work so as not to distort your work. Then:

    1. Pass the wool yarn to be pulled in through the eye of the wool needle.

    2. Stitch the wool needle into a stitch at the high loop that forms the stitch.

    3. Stitch in a stitch again but in the top row at the bottom loop of the stitch.

    4. Stitch your needle into the next stitch on the same row. At this point, the tucked-in yarn takes the shape of the knit stitch.

    5. Finally, pass the yarn through the same starting stitch.

    6. Repeat steps 2 to 5 for about ten stitches, loosely.

    7. Cut the remaining yarn a few millimeters flush with the work.

Note: you may want to stretch your knitting slightly to give it its original shape, as pulling in the yarns may distort the knitting a bit.

Note: the work is tighter on the stockinette stitch, be sure to tuck the threads in gently so as not to stretch the stitches.

Case 2: Bringing in the threads on a ribbed stitch

Slide the protruding thread into the vertical stitches to pull in the threads of a ribbed stitch. The threads are tucked in the direction of the knitting, which allows the threads to be well hidden. It is also possible to tuck the yarns into the selvage stitch on the edge of the knit with the same technique.

    1. Thread the yarn through the eye of the wool needle.

    2. Stitch the needle under the left side of a purl stitch close to the yarn to be tucked in, from the bottom to the top.

    3. Stitch the needle back into the top stitch from the bottom up.

    4. Tuck the yarn in about ten stitches by passing the needle through several stitches simultaneously, then pull the yarn in loosely.

    5. Stitch the needle under the right side strand and turn your work the other way.

    6. Pass the needle through the top strand of the stitch again, from the bottom to the top. Check if this strand is opposite the strand where you have already passed the thread.

    7. Loosely pull the yarn in about ten stitches.

    8. Cut off any excess yarn if necessary.

Tip: if the stitches are deformed after pulling in the threads, feel free to stretch the work slightly with your fingers, and it will return to its original shape.